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Huy Dang grew up in one of Vietnam's most underprivileged cities. Arsen Nikiforouk was raised by his grandparents in a rural village in Ukraine.

With their homes a continent apart, it seems unlikely for them to be friends, much less business partners. But that's what they've become at Drexel. And it was their backgrounds - quite different at first glance, but similar in other ways - that helped bring them together. A few years after they came to Drexel, and just a few months after they met, they've started their own charitable mobile gaming company, called Beep Cloud Help.

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International students may be surprised that U.S. colleges look for well-rounded applicants and are generally flexible about classes and majors.
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By TAMAR LEWIN

SAY farewell to vocabulary flashcards with arcane words like "compendious," "membranous," "mendacious," "pugnacious," "depreciatory," "redolent," "treacly" and "jettison." In the new SAT, to be unveiled in 2015, David Coleman, president of the College Board, wants to get rid of obscure words that are . . . just SAT words, and replace them with more common words like "synthesis," "distill" and "transform," used in context as they will be in college and in life.

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Sometime in 2004 Richard C. Vos, the admission dean at Claremont McKenna College, a highly regarded liberal arts school outside Los Angeles, developed a novel way to meet the school president's demands to improve the quality of incoming classes. He would simply lie.
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Now that the hard work of filling out applications and writing essays is over, you may think all that's left to do is to wait anxiously for an admission decision about your college future. Even if you've turned everything in, however, there are still some things you can do to improve your chances of admission, and to keep your mind occupied while you wait.

 

By Howard and Matthew Greene, hosts of two PBS college planning programs and authors of the Greenes' Guides to Educational Planning series and other books.

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Even from thousands of miles away, parents of international students can help keep their children safe.

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After receiving your acceptance letters, visiting college campuses may not be an option if you are an international student. The New York Times' India Ink blog asked what students can do and which resources are beneficial when deciding where to enroll if they cannot visit the campus.

Along with using the assortment of online resources available, it is recommended that students also watch for admissions officers and alumni who travel and hold information sessions in their home country. Also, take advantage of social media tools and online chats with current international students, alumni, faculty, or administrators. When choosing a school, it is important to understand what you expect of your experience in the U.S., and thoroughly research how a school's programs, student life, and activities might meet these expectations.
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Katherine Dhanani, Consul General at the U.S. Consulate General Hyderabad, shares her thoughts on how she chose Kenyon College as an undergraduate student:

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Enrollment at for-profit schools-including trade schools and online universities-has skyrocketed in recent years. Unfortunately, not all schools offer a quality education and enrolling in a sub-par program can be a waste of time and money. When checking out for-profit schools, the Better Business Bureau recommends doing your research and looking for red flags.
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By STEVE COHEN

 

"Pay me $25,000 and I'll tell you college admission's darkest secret." Far fetched? Not at all, for that is what some private admissions counselors charge families - in exchange for the college admission world's worst-kept secret. And that secret is that early decision really can improve one's odds of getting into some of the nation's most selective colleges.

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